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7 Quick Takes

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7 quick takes sm1 Your 7 Quick Takes Toolkit!

  1. Hm, three people said it on FB/blogs/forums in teh past 24 hours, that if Obama does this or that they are amoving to Canada/Australia/whatever. Other than the this or that they mentioned is already strictly enforced in the country of their choice, what makes them think that they will be allowed to immigrate to that country? It’s not like “I’m American, I can live anywhere I want to, because America is so great everyone will be happy to just have Americans!” Many Americans might not realize it, but they need to go through immigration processes in foreign countries, and *gasp* they can be denied visas!
  2. Buy AVON from me! You can lose weight if you buy my AVON nail polish. If you spend your money on AVON, you won’t have money for groceries and gas, so you won’t put in calories and then you will burn more by walking!
  3. PicturesTen years ago today was the Columbia Space Shuttle disaster. Among the crew members, who lost their lives was Israel’s first and, to date, only astronaut, Ilan Ramon.Unlike the Challenger tragedy, I remember the Columbia disaster very clearly. I remember wondering if the astronauts on board knew what fate awaited them. Today, reading this article I got my answer. They didn’t know.As the Shabbat is fast approaching, I remember the article written about Ilan Ramon’s desire to keep the Shabbat in space. I remember that it was Shabbat morning that he and his fellow crew members lost their lives, due to the damage a small piece of foam did to one of the greatest engineering masterpieces in the history of mankind. And I remember the sadness I felt when I read the news of the death of his eldest son in 2009. I didn’t know them, but Ilan Ramon was a hero for us, Israelis.
    So let’s remember Ilan Ramon, Payload Specialist and the others today:Rick Husband, Commander
    William C. McCool, Pilot
    Michael P. Anderson, Payload Commander
    David M. Brown, Mission Specialist
    Kalpana Chawla, Mission Specialist 2
    Laurel Clark, Mission Specialist 4
  4. When you see a country’s flag in this cute little heart, it means that you see the Eurovision Song Contest country logo. When you use it, I will assume that you are rooting for the entry of the country represented, and will initiate conversation about the national finalists, the song sent to Malmรถ (2013) and generally how unfair the current voting practice still is.Eurovision
  5. Sunday was International Holocaust Rememberance Day.
    duty
  6. If you missed it, I posted two lovely cholent recipes yesterday. I want to find a really good, bean based one (no potatoes) for the slow cooker. Especially for the boys in Haifa. As uni is keeping tehm busier and busier, they can’t come home for every Shabbat, but they love a good cholent.
  7. Shabbat shalom, world! May you all have a peaceful, joyful weekend. I am planning to watch Eurovision related things online and eat a lot of Bamba and krembos. What about you?

20 Responses to “7 Quick Takes”

  1. Ciska says:

    Wait, we’re competing too? Haven’t heard a thing about it. Must be the turn for the French-speaking part of the country.
    Are you seriously selling nail polish? There’s a clichรฉ … ๐Ÿ˜›

    • Hevel @KosherKola says:

      Yes, Belgium will be in the first semifinal, with a song by Roberto Bellarosa. The image, however, from 2010.

      Actually I don’t currently. I sold AVON in Hungary, and apparently I’m still active in the system.

  2. Milena says:

    I’ll spend half of the weekend at the ice-rink, helping my son prepare to compete, watch him compete and cheer for him, and spend time with him while waiting for the medal ceremony. Sunday I will just stay at home! Or no, I won’t, that same son is going to a party and needs to be driven there, and his older sister will go to skating practice. More time at the ice-rink. Yay ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Hevel @KosherKola says:

      I so wish one of my kids had decided on skating. Sigh. Good luck in competition!

      • Milena says:

        Thank you!

        It’s never too late! Some of your children are still little, aren’t they? Do you have an ice-rink nearby?

        • Hevel @KosherKola says:

          I know, I know, I still have 3 who could choose that. Actually my grandson might. He loves the ice, and he is Russian enough to actually have parents, who apreciate figure skating!

          • Milena says:

            Again , I just have to smile about your wonderful family. Your grandson? You are younger than me! But OK, if I had had a child at 16 and that imaginary child had had a child at 16 too, I would have had a grandchild old enough to start skating now…. I know your family has come together differently than mine though, and I find it beautiful.

            I hope that sweet grandson of yours will actually choose figureskating! And if he does, maybe your three youngest might tag along ๐Ÿ™‚ ? If he doesn’t fall for it through watching championships at tv, maybe watching older children might do it? That’s what made my daughter start. Watching the grown-ups at the championships was too abstract for her, but older children made it all seem realistic. She started at age 4 and is now 10. Then the younger brother started at age 2,5….and the youngest at age 4. He’s the wild one.

  3. Nora says:

    I’m just shocked to find out that other countries would not be clapping and cheering to find out that ME, an AMERICAN, would honor them by choosing to live amongst them! What’s that about? A visa is needed???? For *ME*????? Are they aware that their status would be elevated by my American presence? I could point out to them everything they are doing wrong and “fix” them? Well. There’s an eye opener for sure. ;p

    • Hevel @KosherKola says:

      Nora, any country should be honoured to have you. Maybe with the exception of the Vatican. They have only like 800 citizens, so I don’t think they actually want non-clergy there. But all the others. OK, maybe not Iran. Or North Korea. Or Turkmenistan. So the vast majority of countries should be honoured to have you!

  4. Dana Alan Knight says:

    Hevel,

    1. Our family recalls the disaster clearly. My Uncle was a senior NASA official at the time and the shock and horror in Houston was drowned out by the lies and claptrap coming from the insensitive media. Newsflash: We hicks here in Texas don’t spend decades learning advanced engineering just to blow people up. But when you build a billion dollar firecracker loaded with over 400 critical systems you cannot backup – disasters will strike. Tho, tis true, that the ablation tiles were a known design issue that should have been dealt with; and would have been if NASA was not a Gubbermint Lap Dog.

    2. Not all Americans are as foolish as you make us out to be. I know many world travelers who are still so clueless they don’t know what it would take to pull a visa, but we have been seriously searching for a alt.home for over a year.

    3. Thank you for your blog piece on the astronauts. I had completely forgotten that Mr. Ramon was representing Israel. I was working Big Oil at the time in an undisclosed location, and my uncle’s anguish was more than gut wrenching enough.

    Thanks again!

    • Hevel @KosherKola says:

      2. Of course not all Americans are! Many, though, are absolutely ignorant of how the rest of the world works, and are very surprised when they find that they are not welcome somewhere. In Hungary there were so many Americans, who hopped over, and then were surprised that they couldn’t stay over 90 days, that thy couldn’t get a job without a work permit, and when they did, they had to pay into both social security and compulsory pension funds… and they couldn’t get a gun or a hunter’s permit very easily. American immigrants are surprised here that they cannot get gun permits, when we let 18-year-old kids run around guns. Of course as soon as they finish their military terms they have to give those guns back. So actually my head shaking is at these people, who say silly thinks without thinking it through–and without researching their options!

      Good luck with your hunt! If you are willing to go without guns, and accept compulsory and rather decent socialized medicine, Sweden would be a good place to go to. They are hosting Eurovision this year, which is not the most important thing, but I think it’s kinda cool. Plus they are immigration friendly.

      1. and 3. Just knowing that the space shuttles were among the greatest achievements in engineering and they were so vulnerable makes me feel so tiny. We are so far away from the ability to discover the universe’s secrets in person. Of course people don’t think that space is far, that you can’t just send out a rescue team just like that, that a gazillion things can go wrong. I am actually happy that the astronauts were not aware that they were more than likely to die upon return. I was also sad that ten years later I only remembered three of the seven names, while I still remember the names of all the major characters of ALL the Star Trek series. ๐Ÿ™ My son is studying to be an aerospeace engineer and he has been inspired to choose this field of study by people like Ilan Ramon and even by space tourist Charles Simonyi. Actually we quite like Simonyi at my house.

      • Dana Alan Knight says:

        Ha, ha,

        2. Yes, I know the type.

        No, I don’t think Sweden will do. I’m a Texan born and raised. I spent a decade in Alaska working oil. That’s enough winter.

        Been around a bit, and I’m not sure why anyone would want a gun overseas. In dangerous places, I’d rather pack a tad more heat than anything permitted, and in safe places I’d be concerned about the risk of a crook stealing your weapon. I’ve had friends who worked Columbia, Libya, Chechnya, Nigeria, and Iraq. A gun is useless – you need an army. OTH, we managed Thailand, Philippines, and even China without any trouble. Knew one guy who came back from Russia white as a sheet, but he’d been out in the boonies doing surveys and I take it the locals were not friendly. Here in Texas, gun ownership is popular, but then you might have to live here to understand why.

        Our main concerns, lifestyle wise, are property values and property taxes. We are v. American in expecting more space than world norms. I know homes are small overseas, but the family isn’t used to that. We also are typical Americans in plumbing issues and electricity usage. This isn’t an insurmountable issue, but not simple as you know. There are many good locations that would make the list if I could afford a bedroom for everyone. Frankly, I’d like to try Ireland or Australia. All of us are Irish (potato famine people), and Australia is not so different from Texas. We even have cool snakes and poisonous insects in Texas!

        1. and 3. Understood. Fallen heroes fade, but William Shatner and George Takei twitter.

        Glad to read your son is studying to be an AerosPeace Engineer. We need more peace. ;-)) But if he needs to consider the job market, he should think of electrical, software, etc., or civil too. A multidisciplinary degree may be a good idea. Aerospace can be rough going when the job market tightens. Of course… not to bring up a sore subject, but Israel may need to start building her own jets. If we go much crazier, who knows what the wacko’s in DC will do?

        ๐Ÿ˜‰

        • Hevel @KosherKola says:

          Hmm, Ireland… I don’t think we have anywhere near Texas standanrd living spaces, plus it’s cool and wet there all the time. Plus immigration from outside the EU can be a nightmare. I hope you don’t mind, but I asked Kevin where he’d look for property if he wanted the specifications that you listed, and he said Spain or a chรขteau in Southern France. Currently we like France, they just passed the resolution about gay marriage. I don’t really like them because of their ban on hijabs, though. Way to produce Muslim radicals.

          I think aerospeace was my best typo yesterday! He is an atudai, part of his tuition is paid by the Israeli military, and will have 5 or 6 years in the military upon graduation. At least. So he is not too worried about employability, as he has a nice, long military career ahead of him.

          • Dana Alan Knight says:

            Yep, agreed.

            Oh, so the young man is studying on a military scholarship. Well, I won’t knock that. More power to him.

            Ireland though has options, or did as of a just awhile back, for ‘native’ sons. I.E. I can document my ancestors from Ireland. That’s a big plus, or was the last time we checked. Also, there are advantages of Irish-to-Other-locations, or were. Yeah, the changing landscape is another issue.

            Spain – great choice – I have friends who lived in Madrid (Academics – Church History), and colleagues who lived in Valencia. (State Dept) All of them loved it. Their reports are glowing. I’m just not sure, with the financial crisis, if it’s worth the hassle until they solve their debt crisis.

            France, I’d love to visit, but I doubt I’d outlive the ‘ugly american’ stage (I’m getting older). I have a colleague who lives in the SOOOUUUUTHHHH Ovvvv FFwwaaaance (Math Professor). He’s bad enough in person with or without snails. I have one friend who lives in Dordogne (Novelist), but she’s half native, I think, and fully fluent. I’d have to drawlll myyy wayyy thruuu, if you know what I mean. ;-))) I am from Texas. And they too have a debt crisis.

            And then there’s Italy – mixed bag. My non-white friends hate the place, but Euro-Americans and Asian-American friends love it. Can’t say what that means; as my European travel is all north of the Alps. But it gives me some pause. And they too have a debt crisis.

            Thanks for the feedback. Take care!! ๐Ÿ˜‰

            • Milena says:

              If you avoid the north of Sweden, I doubt our winter is worse than Ireland’s. Where I live it’s mostly rain and fog ๐Ÿ™‚ And pretty in the summer. And Americans are considered cool by most people. Houses are generally big, and if you would consider living outside the big cities (which aren’t big anyway by American standards) the houses are affordable.
              ๐Ÿ™‚

  5. jen says:

    Yes, one of the groups I’m part of on Facebook had one person getting passports because she and her husband were positive that they were going to move to Australia if Obama was re-elected.

    Really? Can we just take your citizenship from you and give it to someone who actually *wants it*?

    (Apparently, some moron spread some rumor that Australia was pro-gun with a Christian prime minister and no gay rights.)
    jen recently posted..7 Quick Takes: Sybilโ€™s Death, Pre-Gaming, and Go Niners!My Profile

    • Hevel @KosherKola says:

      I have bad news for them about Australia. Of course I could just point them to Google. ๐Ÿ™‚

      In one of my forums some Jews decided to make aliyah if Obamacare and gun control and high taxes remain. I pointed out to them that it’s extremely difficult to get a gun permit in Israel, we have socialized medicine, and our highest tax bracket is 48% + 2% if you make a lot, a lot of money. They didn’t like it.

      • jen says:

        I think people don’t realize what immigration entails these days. I only know about moving to Canada because that was a distinct possibility almost 4 years ago (not because of Obama — Jon was up for call in several congregations) and I know that it would have taken a huge amount of paperwork if he had been called to either congregation.

        It also bugs me that people don’t want to stay and try to work for good in the US. Then again (as one of them nastily pointed out), we probably have a big disparity in what we consider “good”.
        jen recently posted..The Proverbs 31 Project: Her husband has full confidence in herโ€ฆMy Profile

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