logo

7 Quick Takes Friday

logo

— 1 —

Yotvata rocks. I love it here. All I need is a can of alcohol free beer, and the opportunity to pet some baby calves. I’ll be content for a while.

— 2 —

Being happy. Being content. Sunshine. Family. Friends. Yotvata iced latte. Life is sweet and bubbly today.

— 3 —

This makes me think about joy, happiness, pleasure and contentment. I kind of wish I wasn’t this lazy so I’d actually write down my thoughts. You’d might think that I’m smart or something. I really am not that smart, but I like to contemplate the mysteries of life. That and what on earth made Harel Skaat sing “I’m Every Woman” yesterday.

— 4 —

I think yesterday’s entry was one of the most significant ones I’ve written in the past year. A lot of it was boiling inside me for years, and finally I found both the courage and the words to express those thoughts. I have a lot more thoughts on the adoption idustry, the ethics (and the Maciavellianism) of the whole thing, but I think it will take several more months to be able to put those thoughts into words. Till then, read Garden of Eagan!

— 5 —

I’m running around without a shirt. People keep asking me about various scars. What happened to not asking a guy about his scars? And when I say I don’t like talking about it… why can’t people leave me alone?

— 6 —

I’m shocked by that Whitney Houston tribute song, still. 🙂

— 7 —

As we drove from TA to Yotvata we stopped at two places: IKEA and dropping off my SIL in Be’er Sheva. Both saw us eat a lunch. Upon arriving here… we had lunch. I think three lunches beat the hobbits’ two breakfasts.

For more Quick Takes, visit Conversion Diary!

10 Responses to “7 Quick Takes Friday”

  1. Andi says:

    1.) Még mindíg nem hiszem el, hogy nem vettél valamit az IKEA-ban! 😀

    2.) Hogy is volt ez a megyékkel az evéssel és a hobbitokkal??? Átmegy 3 megyén és kétszer reggelizik, az a hobbit?! 😀 Ez valahogy az ácsom időszakából rémlik… 😀

    3.) Pihenj, pihenj, PIHENJ!!! 🙂

    4.) Vedd le az inged, és küldd el a sunyiba a téged bámulókat!

    5.) …és végül…
    OKOS VAGY! 🙂
    Ne hadakozz ellene, Te vagy az egyik legokosabb ember, akivel valaha is összehozott a jószerencse! 🙂

    • Hevel says:

      1. Csak ebédeltem. Tömeg volt, nem volt kedvem bemenni vásárolni.
      2. Izé. Nem nagyon szeret kimenni a Megyéből, de 2x reggelizik. 😀
      3. Pihentem. Olyan borjú sültet ettem…

  2. Ciska says:

    I really ‘liked’ your post on the adoption industry. It’s so important that people are honest and fair when it comes to children in such vulnerable position. Adoption is very, very regulated here in Belgium, which is crucial, I believe, for the safety of the children. It has its downsides too of course. At the moment, the whole adoption process takes eight to ten years.
    About the scars, I would probably tell them some crazy story about a T-Rex I conquered or something like that. It would shut them up.

    • Hevel says:

      I do think that adoption is complicated in many countries. I also think that strict regulations need to be put in place. I hate it, however, when people from certain countries think they are better and morally above the law of other countries.

      Do you know how Kate’s adoption is going?

      I had a companion on my mission, who lost a leg thanks to an accident with a crocodile. I think I can never beat his true story!

      • Ciska says:

        Actually, when an adoption organization from country A doesn’t follow the rules of country B (where they’re adopting from), the government of country A should stop the organization. If they don’t, country B will assume organizations from country A will always break the rules and stop all adoptions from there. Do I want SN adoptions from EE to stop? No way! However, I do want illegal actions to stop. In other words: I want ‘them’ to start working completely legal and transparent.

        I don’t have a lot of information about Kate’s adoption. I do have contact with the family through Facebook, but they don’t share a lot about the process there.

        • Hevel says:

          Unfortunately, the organization from country A prefers to keep hush about illegal activity rather than do something… I hope they will soon…

  3. doesitevenmatter3 says:

    I like your Friday posts! I’m late reading this one!
    Busy weekend, and Monday for me!!! 🙂

    Several of these made me smile! 🙂

    Yah, on the scar asking? What’s up with people on that?!

    HUGS! 🙂

  4. Annie says:

    It is lovely to think of you enjoying yourself, so happy and lazy….

    Well; I do think that adoption is far TOO regulated in some countries – the idea that it should take 8 years is nonsense! Think of the children who are going without parents for that length of time! And, frankly, a lot of adopters don’t decide to do it until they are already mature – either because they have raised their own children, or because they try everything to HAVE their own children prior to deciding to adopt…then, they may have to spend some time acquiring money…..another 8 years and they will be adjudged too old….and it certainly limits the opportunity to adopt multiple times.

    There was some country in Europe recently that denied a couple the opportunity to adopt the child THEY HAD BEEN FOSTERING for five years because of some ridiculous thing – I read so many of these stories that I can’t remember if that was the case where they were said to have too many children (not too many to RAISE the child – only to let the child feel part of their family). Absurd. The child was a teen by this time and totally unlikely to be adopted – did not WANT to be adopted by another family, but wasn’t allowed to be a part of that one. In another case, the couple was told that their marriage was too peaceful and happy, and the child needed more exposure to disharmony. That one was Britain….and there were actual quotations from the judgement, which would have been funny if it wasn’t so sad. Here, it is so often quibbling about the race of the parents/children. A family I know fostered a Native American boy from a disruption. He’d lived with a white family for EIGHT years, since he was 3, and loved them; but the Tribal Social Worker said that family could not adopt him; he had to be with members of the tribe if possible and they found a family – a family who abused him until he ran away. THEN my friends got him. His previous family, who’d wanted to adopt him, had ended up adopting another sibling set so the authorities did not allow him to go back to them.

    The problem with all the regulations is that though they all undoubtedly MEAN well – race IS important, a smaller family COULD possibly be better….it so often ISN’T how things LOOK that matters….but how things ARE and that can’t be codified.

    Just last week there was a saint buried in our parish. The dearest lady. She taught second grade for years here at the school, then taught Religion for me, which is one way I ended up knowing her. She and her husband raised seven girls, and for most of that time, they lived in a tiny two-bedroom house. But, every one of those girls is a credit to their amazingly kind and loving parents. That household must have radiated love because every member of that family does. But – they never would have been allowed to ADOPT seven girls! So, I’m not sure what the answer is.

    When you are going through an adoption, I felt that it was VERY hard to be JUDGED – particularly when I wasn’t always all that impressed with the people doing the judging. You understand intellectually that if people are going to let you have children in your home, you need to be found worthy. But, I am sure that especially for couples who cannot have their own children, that it rankles knowing that their fertile neighbors don’t have to allow anyone to judge how they live. Neither do the wealthy folk having medical treatments to create pregnancy. Something isn’t quite right, but I can’t figure out what!

  5. Annie says:

    It is lovely to think of you enjoying yourself, so happy and lazy….

    Well; I do think that adoption is far TOO regulated in some countries – the idea that it should take 8 years is nonsense! Think of the children who are going without parents for that length of time! And, frankly, a lot of adopters don’t decide to do it until they are already mature – either because they have raised their own children, or because they try everything to HAVE their own children prior to deciding to adopt…then, they may have to spend some time acquiring money…..another 8 years and they will be adjudged too old….and it certainly limits the opportunity to adopt multiple times.

    There was some country in Europe recently that denied a couple the opportunity to adopt the child THEY HAD BEEN FOSTERING for five years because of some ridiculous thing – I read so many of these stories that I can’t remember if that was the case where they were said to have too many children (not too many to RAISE the child – only to let the child feel part of their family). Absurd. The child was a teen by this time and totally unlikely to be adopted – did not WANT to be adopted by another family, but wasn’t allowed to be a part of that one. In another case, the couple was told that their marriage was too peaceful and happy, and the child needed more exposure to disharmony. That one was Britain….and there were actual quotations from the judgement, which would have been funny if it wasn’t so sad. Here, it is so often quibbling about the race of the parents/children. A family I know fostered a Native American boy from a disruption. He’d lived with a white family for EIGHT years, since he was 3, and loved them; but the Tribal Social Worker said that family could not adopt him; he had to be with members of the tribe if possible and they found a family – a family who abused him until he ran away. THEN my friends got him. His previous family, who’d wanted to adopt him, had ended up adopting another sibling set so the authorities did not allow him to go back to them.

    The problem with all the regulations is that though they all undoubtedly MEAN well – race IS important, a smaller family COULD possibly be better….it so often ISN’T how things LOOK that matters….but how things ARE and that can’t be codified.

    Just last week there was a saint buried in our parish. The dearest lady. She taught second grade for years here at the school, then taught Religion for me, which is one way I ended up knowing her. She and her husband raised seven girls, and for most of that time, they lived in a tiny two-bedroom house. But, every one of those girls is a credit to their amazingly kind and loving parents. That household must have radiated love because every member of that family does. But – they never would have been allowed to ADOPT seven girls! So, I’m not sure what the answer is.

    When you are going through an adoption, I felt that it was VERY hard to be JUDGED – particularly when I wasn’t always all that impressed with the people doing the judging. You understand intellectually that if people are going to let you have children in your home, you need to be found worthy. But, I am sure that especially for couples who cannot have their own children, that it rankles knowing that their fertile neighbors don’t have to allow anyone to judge how they live. Neither do the wealthy folk having medical treatments to create pregnancy. Something isn’t quite right, but I can’t figure out what!

    • Hevel says:

      I wrote a very long reply to your comment, but then Chrome decided to censor me and shut down.

      To summarize: Race and culture are more important than white folks think. If G-d doesn’t give you the ability to procreate than yes, you have to be examined and scrutinized. Life is just not fair. Kids whoa re adopted already come from a situation of loss, so everything has to be done to give them the most ideal setting. I think parents in the States are allowed to adopt too easily. There is no real check before, during and after the adoption. I think everyone should be required to parent the child they are to adopt 30-90 days in the child’s location of origin before even a court date is assigned. Adoption industry with the inflated prices adds to the wait. A long adoption process doesn’t increase the number of waiting children, because it’s always the next group of available children who get adopted.

      I might add that the extra long waiting times are for infant and small child adoptions. A Hague statistics in my textbook shows that for the EU the average process time for infant adoption is 4 times as long as for adoption for a child age 3 and up.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

logo
logo
Powered by WordPress | Designed by Elegant Themes

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close